Graduate Students

Literature Graduate Students

Abdul Aijaz

Abdul Aijaz

Graduate Student

My research explores different ideas of water and rivers in the Indus Basin. Using postcolonial ecocritical and new materialist theories, I try to understand the simultaneous instantiation of the Indus rivers as gods and machines in colonial and postcolonial India and Pakistan while also asking the crucial questions of knowledge production and power relations on local and global scales. By using fiction, folklore, and scientific texts together, the research destabilizes the fact-fiction and word-world binaries to make the deity in the machine visible. Interests are: Postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, vital materialism, south Asian literature.

Sami Atassi

Sami Atassi

Graduate Student

Sami Atassi is a native Houstonian and Ph.D. candidate in English Literature. Sami's primary focus of study is the aesthetic use of terror for comedic effect in Antebellum American literature. His other interests include studying Arabic, developing a critical theory of social media, and indulging in the mysteries of Agatha Christie.

Beth Bevis Gallick

Graduate Student

My research focuses on the intersection of religious belief and literary form. I am currently completing a dissertation entitled “The Social Life of Victorian Conviction,” on the ways in which expressions of religious conviction disrupted and shaped Victorian social life as well as the period’s major literary forms. At Indiana University, I have taught courses in composition (W131), professional writing (W231), and literary interpretation (L260). I have also served as Managing Editor of Victorian Studies (2011-2013) and Associate Creative Nonfiction editor at Indiana Review (2010-2012).

Jaclyn Bitsis

Graduate Student

I work on 20th century British literature and culture with a particular interest in pop culture. My dissertation investigates constructions of Englishness through representations of popular music in film and the novel; its primary texts range from dub reggae to popular wartime cinema to the modernist novel. I argue that these texts' representations of music make possible a re-imagining of the spaces that determine the meanings of Englishness, but that these experiments in form greatly vary in their degree of success.

Molly Boggs

Molly Boggs

Graduate Student

My research theorizes the Victorian lodging, rather than the Victorian house, as a key cultural influence on ideas about domesticity, sexuality, and space in nineteenth-century England. I’m interested in the relationship between interior space and literary form, especially in fiction about spaces considered marginal to the middle-class home—for example, drafty garrets where sisters huddled in a shared bed, dormitories where shopgirls slept bunk to bunk, and stuffy back bedrooms where bachelors hid their tea from snooping landladies. My interests also include Victorian ghost stories and detective fiction, and I’m an avid reader of George Gissing, Thomas Hardy, and Anthony Trollope.

Jon Booth

Jon Booth

Graduate Student

Jon Booth is a doctoral candidate studying Romanticism and 18th Century literature with an interest in phenomenology, aesthetics, and medical theory.

Rory Boothe

Rory Boothe

Graduate Student

I came to the Department of English in the fall of 2016 after graduating from Louisiana State University, where I completed research on the black queer aesthetics of the Harlem Renaissance as I read it in Wallace Thurman's novel Infants of the Spring. My research interests revolve around 20th-century American and transnational queer narratives and the ways in which they deal with aesthetics, environment, and regionality, in general. I am also interested in late 19th and 20th-century continental philosophy and its connections with theory of visual culture.

Mary Bowden

Mary Bowden

Graduate Student

Mary Bowden studies Victorian literature and ecocriticism. Her dissertation, "Plant Plots: Horticulture, Plant Science, and Victorian Narrative," examines how Victorian plant culture contributed to the development of ecological thinking in nineteenth-century Britain, and includes chapters on Darwin's botanical works, horticultural periodicals, and novels by George Eliot and H. G. Wells. From 2014-2016, she was a managing editor of the journal Victorian Studies.

Shannon Boyer

Graduate Student

Shannon Boyer is a Teaching Fellow and Ph.D. candidate in English literature. Her focus is on early twentieth century American and British literature particularly literary modernism and its intersection with the sexual and mental sciences of the period.

John Brooks

John Brooks

Graduate Student

My interests revolve around race and racialization in twentieth and twenty-first century American literature, particularly race's relationship to black music and performance. In my current project, I am examining contemporary artists who are invested in radical art projects (including literary, photographic, musical, and performative projects) that resist audience interpretation and, consequently, disrupt devices of racial legitimation. I maintain that these projects’ transgressive subversion results in the defamiliarization of racial ideology and the refamiliarization of a type of radical blackness.

Jordan Bunzel

Jordan Bunzel

Graduate Student

Jordan received his B.A. in English literature with a correlate in classics at Vassar College. He is a Literature M.A./Ph.D. student interested in nineteenth-century novels, classics, disability studies, and embodiment. Currently, Jordan studies depictions of the classicist’s body in late Victorian works by Mary Augusta Ward and George Gissing.

Julie Chamberlin

Julie Chamberlin

Graduate Student

Julie Chamberlin is a medievalist pursing her Ph.D. in English literature. Her research interests focus on the intersection of medieval law and literature of the 12th and 13th centuries and how this intersection illuminates premodern understandings of subjecthood and agency. She has taught three sections of a self-designed composition course, W170: Dystopia in Popular Culture, and won the first-year Teaching Portfolio Award in 2015. Julie currently serves as a member of the Graduate Student Advisory Committee, which organizes the IU Interdisciplinary Conference in March.

Michael Chambers

Michael Chambers

Graduate Student

I am a Ph.D. candidate in Literature with a concentration in Victorian Studies.  Broadly, my research interests span nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British and American literature.  My dissertation explores how Victorian realist conceptions of reality and the human experience of it evolved through an engagement with aspects of the period’s empiricist thought, specifically regarding limits to knowledge, and the nature of reality and human consciousness.

Phil Choong

Graduate Student

Phil Choong is a Ph.D. student working on literary studies' recent turn towards surface reading and other models of post-critical engagement with texts. This project brings together ongoing conversations in literary criticism and ethics, and situates them in the context of rhetorical studies by asking how this re-imagined relationship between authors and readers might have consequences for the relationship between teachers and students, and composition pedagogy more specifically.

Cherae Clark

Cherae Clark

Graduate Student

In my writing and research, I explore themes of queerness, war literature and [post-]colonialism. I’m especially interested in how these appear in science fiction and fantasy. Particular interests within these categories: language learning and forgetting, post-traumatic stress disorder, post-war reconstruction, and gender queerness. I am currently at work on a fantasy novel inspired by the colonial relationships between France and North Africa. Teaching interests include queer literature, science fiction and fantasy novel writing, and community youth writing.

Mallory Cohn

Mallory Cohn

Graduate Student

I am a Ph.D. Candidate in Literature, specializing in nineteenth-century Britain, childhood studies, and disability studies. My dissertation explores the construction of precociousness within and across Victorian religious, medical, educational, and eugenic texts and discourses. I’m interested in the ways in which precocity emerges as a nineteenth-century disability or “disease of modernity” that many commentators attempted to pathologize and contain, as well as in the spaces where exceptional children were recognized as possessing authority and agency, complicating the usual narrative of the child doomed by her own capacity and independence. I eventually hope to connect my work to the contemporary discourse of “giftedness.”

Adam Coombs

Adam Coombs

Graduate Student

My research interrogates the role of entrepreneurship within African American literature and culture. I track how business ownership and culture provided a form of uplift and civic engagement during the Progressive Era that extended to and inspired writers of this period.

Christie Debelius

Christie Debelius

Graduate Student

Christie is an MA/PhD student studying British Romanticism. Her interests include Romantic conceptions of fame, immortality, and audience—particularly in Keats. Most recently, her research has focused on reading, print media, and violence during the Romantic period. Christie has taught several sections of first-year composition and is currently teaching a composition course about originality and reboot films in popular culture.

Benjamin Debus

Ben Debus

Graduate Student

Ben Debus is a Ph.D. student studying medieval literature in English. His research interests include allegory, dream visions, and aesthetics, and span the historical range of the medieval period. He also holds an M.F.A. in Poetry from Indiana University, and he has taught courses in Creative Writing, Literature, and Composition.

Samantha Demmerle

Samantha Demmerle

Graduate Student

I am a third year in the department and my intellectual interests include Early Modern literature, new Science Fiction theories, Materialism, new Materialism, new Formalism, and Actor Network theory. All of that jargon simply implies that I am fascinated by the intersections of subjectivity, science, and technology, and how literature can explore and develop new ways of framing those networks. I try to work these questions into my teaching as well, and for the past year I have developed a W131 curriculum that uses the crux of sleep in the modern 24/7 lifestyle to interrogate different subjectivities with my students.

Derek Dimatteo

Derek DiMatteo

Graduate Student

A scholar of C20/21 American literature and culture, Derek DiMatteo is writing his dissertation on Higher Education Protest Literature.  Scholarly interests include university fiction, transnationalism and migration, African American literature, and critical pedagogy.  At IU, Derek has taught composition courses (e.g. W131 and J101), including a course of his own design W170: Representations of Schooling in US Culture, and has been nominated for an outstanding teaching award. Derek holds an MAT in English education from Tufts University and taught in Japan for over eight years, including four years at Lakeland University’s Tokyo campus.

Steven Gallick

Graduate Student

I'm a Ph.D. candidate whose work focuses on British and American Modernism. I also have a minor in Performance Studies and an interest in Genre Fiction.

Jessica George

Jessica George

Graduate Student

My research interests include American environmental history and the history of science and medicine. My dissertation focuses on representations of miasma theory and miasmic spaces in 19th- and early 20th- century U.S. literature. I am also interested in literature and pedagogies of climate change. I am currently co-Assistant Director of First-Year Composition at IU.

Savannah Hall

Savannah Hall

Graduate Student

Savannah Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate and the Albert Wertheim Dissertation Fellow for the 2016-2017 academic year. Her areas of focus include performance and theatre studies, American modernism, African diaspora studies, and 20th century African literature. Her dissertation, "Fashioning Africa: Racial Imagination in American Modernism and the African Diaspora", examines fashionable Africanist performances in literary and visual culture from the 1920s through the 1970s. Her project considers the stage as a contact zone on which various conceptions of a fashionable, modernist African subjectivity develop in the United States as well as in Western and Southern Africa during the 20th century.

Molly Hamer

Molly Hamer

Graduate Student

Molly Hamer's work focuses on late nineteenth and early twentieth-century American literature, with a particular emphasis on women's writing and discourses of modernity. She is writing a dissertation exploring the publication of women writers of color in the mainstream American periodical press at the turn of the century.

Kelly Hanson

Graduate Student

Kelly Hanson’s dissertation examines the ways that Haiti has been used as a literary and rhetorical device in twentieth-century U.S. literature. As an interdisciplinary, archival project, this dissertation extends our understandings of the ways that narratives of Haiti previously considered tangential to modernist literary production were in fact a central part of modernist conceptions of race and nation in the United States. Her research interests include Transnational Modernist Literature and Culture; African American and African Diaspora Studies; Comparative Ethnic and Postcolonial Studies; and Performance Studies. She teaches courses in professional and technical communication, composition, argumentative writing, and introduction to fiction, which approaches writing through literature.

Stephen Hopkins

Stephen Hopkins

Graduate Student

My research interests center on medieval literature. I practice comparative philology, so Anglo-Saxon as well as Old Norse, Middle Welsh, Medieval Irish, and Latin. I also work on the philosophy of hermeneutics, eschatology and theology, cognitive approaches to literature, Late Antique Apocrypha, and medievalism (especially J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, and M.R. James). I explore all but the last of these in my dissertation, "The Infernal Dialectic Laboratory: Vernacular Infernal Apocrypha and Early Medieval Theological/Cognitive Experimentation." Check me out on academia.edu: https://indiana.academia.edu/StephenHopkins

Tracey Hutchings-Goetz

Tracey Hutchings-Goetz

Graduate Student

Tracey Hutchings-Goetz is a doctoral candidate specializing in long eighteenth-century British literature, and a dissertation year fellow through IU’s Center for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Her dissertation, Touchy Subjects: An Eighteenth-Century Anatomy of Haptic Sensation, offers a corporeally structured revaluation of the sense of touch—and, by extension, the other senses—in eighteenth-century Britain. Organized around four forms of touch (nerves, skin, hands, and invisible hands), her project suggests connections between the experience of embodiment and the narrative and epistemological structures of the period.

Aaron Kessler

Aaron Kessler

Graduate Student

I study nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature and culture. My work engages with scholarship on modernism and modernity, critical race theory, temporality, place and space, new southern studies, and eco-criticism. I’m also interested more broadly in American cultural and intellectual history. My dissertation, “Wary Travelin’: The Antimodern Impulse in African American Literature, 1890-1918,” examines black American writers’ critical engagement with processes and narratives of modernization at the century’s turn. My teaching interests include American and world literature, children’s literature, composition, analytical and creative writing, technical communication, and service learning.

Jeffrey C. Kessler

Jeffrey C. Kessler

Graduate Student

My dissertation, “The Imaginary Portrait in Late Nineteenth Century Britain,” examines the imaginary portrait, a prose character study that uses the revelation of character to examine the rhetorical ends of criticism. Beginning with the work of Walter Pater, I show how this form developed from the dramatic monologue and essayistic traditions, and then argue that this understudied form is essential to understanding authors such as Henry James, Vernon Lee, and Oscar Wilde, who used the imaginary portrait to develop new critical methods influenced by philosophical impressionism, essayistic criticism, and literary fiction.

Patrick Kindig

Patrick Kindig

Graduate Student

Patrick Kindig is a dual M.F.A./Ph.D. candidate in literary studies. He works with American literature from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and his general interests include queer theory, affect theory, and phenomenology. He is particularly interested in the role played by fascination—a phenomenon that overwhelms and inhibits rational thought—in both modernist and antimodernist aesthetics.

JiHae Koo

Graduate Student

I am interested in late 19th-early 20th British lit, in particular the relationship between science and literature.

Kristina Krasny

Kristina Krasny

Graduate Student

My primary area of study is Early Modern literature and drama, although I also have an interest in the Victorian Era and modern adaptation. My secondary interests include existential and natural philosophies, particularly with regard to how philosophical discourse shapes both literary culture and the broader academic community. Additional areas of focus in my work include psychology, disability studies, and pedagogy. More specifically, I am deeply interested in the pedagogical practices used at all levels of education to teach literature to underrepresented groups, including the Deaf community and first-generation students.

Hoi Na Kung

Hoi Na Stephanie Kung

Graduate Student

My research examines the intersections between embodiment and citizenship in twentieth-century century African American and Asian American literature. Drawing upon affect theory, theory of the senses and critical race theory, I investigate the ways in which embodied subjects maintain desire, attachment, and sense of belonging to the national body-politic in the face of ongoing material, political, and psychic exclusion. I am also interested in considering alternative models of citizenship that do not deny and disavow embodied existence, but turn to embodied acts as contestations of exclusion. My research also asks after the political significance of American ethnic texts beyond their representative value. To this end, I attend to ethnic texts with modernist and postmodernist aesthetics in order to explore how the materiality of sights and sounds of a text can express political agency and resistance.

Sarah Le

Sarah Le

Graduate Student

I focus primarily on 16th and 17th century British drama and poetry, with emphasis on texts that deal with intersecting issues of colonialism, race, gender/sexuality, subjecthood, power, and agency. I am also interested in pop culture Shakespeare and theories of adaptation, cultural commodities, performance, and visual culture.

Mi Jeong Lee

Mi Jeong Lee

Graduate Student

My field is British modernism, specifically the modernist novel. My dissertation focuses on distance as a central critical concept in the modernist novel, and argues that modernist writers re-imagined the form of the novel so that it is no longer predicated upon the kind of distance that is complicit with an imperialist world-view.

Sarah Line

Sarah Line

Graduate Student

Sarah Line is a literature M.A./Ph.D. student who focuses on medieval literature. Her research interests include anything and everything Viking, particularly legendary sagas. She focuses primarily on perspectives of heroes and monsters and how these perspectives change throughout various medieval texts. She also spends a great deal of her time daydreaming about Valhalla.

Jennifer Lopatin

Graduate Student

My research interests focus on intersections of political and/or secular prophecy and jesters/wise fools in medieval contexts to examine how these intersections inform, reflect, and extend questions of knowledge, boundaries, and proto-nationalism. I am currently focusing primarily on Arthurian literature and the figure of Merlin in particular to explore these questions. I will present a paper titled on the prophesying jester in Chretien de Troyes’ Perceval at the International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo in May 2016. I have successfully taught multiple sections of freshman composition and received the Composition Program Teaching Portfolio Award in the spring of 2016.

Lisa Low

Lisa Low

Graduate Student

Lisa Low was born and raised in Maryland. She received her B.A. from Rice University and M.S. in Education from Northwestern University. Her poems have appeared in or are forthcoming in Drunken Boat, Vinyl, Day One, The Journal, The Collagist, and elsewhere.

Michael Lutz

Graduate Student

Michael Lutz is a Ph.D. student in English literature, specializing in Shakespeare, early modern drama, media theory, and new media studies. His dissertation looks at the intersections of early modern drama, Renaissance humanism, and theories of posthumanism. Since 2014 he has worked with the department on designing and teaching a new online version of the W131 Elementary Composition course.

Elizabeth Maffetone

Elizabeth Maffetone

Graduate Student

Elizabeth Maffetone is a medievalist whose work focuses on Chaucer, gender, narrative, and misrecognition.

TJ Martinson

T.J. Martinson

Graduate Student

T.J. Martinson is a Literature PhD student. His interests include 20th/21st century American literature, new materialisms, and Marxism.

John J. McGlothlin

Graduate Student

My research focuses on contemporary US literature and culture, particularly as they interact with global capitalism, and speaks to such fields as American studies, cultural studies, and economic history. My dissertation, “Underwritten: Finance Capitalism and US Culture after 1970,” explores the representational practices attendant to the recent “financialization” of the US economy. Its genre-oriented analysis charts the ways in which cultural artifacts alternately normalize and challenge the discourses that sustain finance capitalism. My work has appeared in the interdisciplinary journal Biography.

Trevor McMichael

Trevor McMichael

Graduate Student

I am a Ph.D. student specializing in Romantic and Victorian literature, and my work is informed by theories of gender, queerness, violence, and narrative. I have published on connections between gender and patriotism in late eighteenth-century epistolary fiction in The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation (2015), and I am currently pursuing work on Romantic-era representations of revenge and eroticism as well as on Victorian historical fiction depicting or set during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. From 2017-2019, I will serve as an editorial assistant for the journal Victorian Studies.

Joseph Morgan

Joseph Morgan

Graduate Student

Scholarly interests: Medieval literature from England, in particular works touching on Marian piety from 1350-1500. Teaching Interests: Middle English language and literature; history of the English language; digital humanities; writing pedagogy and composition.

Lindsay Munnelly

Lindsay Munnelly

Graduate Student

Scholarly Interests: My area of research is the late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century novel in Britain. I am specifically interested in narrative theory, Victorian conceptions of property and ownership, the British aristocracy, and posthumanist theories of agency. My dissertation, titled “The Erosion of Ownership in the British Novel, 1870-1920,” explores how the realist novel makes room for the agential potential of the nonhuman amid the shrinking economic and political power of the aristocracy. Teaching Interests: At IU, I have taught W131: Elementary Composition, W170: The Superhero in American Pop Culture, and W202: English Grammar Review. I have also TA-ed for L312, a survey course on British and American literature in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Steve Nathaniel

Steve Nathaniel

Graduate Student

My research interests include twentieth century poetry and poetics, and their correspondence with science. Specifically, I try to explain how poets negotiate the scientific developments that underpin modernism’s most fruitful aesthetic problems. Currently, I am studying the theories of sound that often furnish modern aesthetics, such as in Gertrude Stein’s invocation of rhythm. In the past I have drawn on my experiences as a mechanical engineer to investigate the effects of idealized efficiency in 19th and 20th century poetics.

Brian O'Connor

Graduate Student

My dissertation, “Narrative Posturing: Delimiting the Author-Index in the Contemporary American Novel,” defines a hyper-form of authorial self-insertion prevalent in recent U.S. fictions, a device I call the author-index. Author-indexical literature, I show, challenges conventional models of fictionality by radically rethinking fiction's relationship to the real, to the self, and to truth. Accordingly, my work seeks to rethink theories of reference and identity as they have historically informed theories of fictionality. Examining the device as used by Philip Roth, John Wideman, Lauren Slater, Tim O’Brien, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Dave Eggers, I show the ways in which contemporary literature conceives of fiction as a powerful means for accessing and making sense of reality and experience

Brooke Opel

Brooke A. Opel

Graduate Student

Brooke A. Opel is an English Literature Ph.D. candidate with a focus in nineteenth-century American and transatlantic literature. Her research interests include gender and sexuality, feminism, early psychology, sentimental and domestic fiction, and theories of reading. Her dissertation explores the ways in which American sentimental novels engaged with early nineteenth-century mental sciences, such as phrenology, mesmerism, and physiological psychology. She is Book Review Editor of _Victorian Studies_, and represents Region 4, Great Lakes as a regional delegate on the MLA Delegate Assembly.

Evelyn Reynolds

Evelyn Reynolds

Graduate Student

Evelyn Reynolds focuses on English Literature from 800-1400. Her dissertation works with Old and Middle English poems about transience and eternity. Her other research interests include poetics and creative writing pedagogy, form, affect, and representations of nature, death, and Christianity. She has an M.A. in English Literature and an M.F.A. in Poetry from Indiana University.

Grace Schmitt

Graduate Student

Grace Schmitt is a Ph.D. student in the literature program. She specializes in 18th-century British literature, with research interests in sexuality and consent.

Rachel Seiler-Smith

Rachel Seiler-Smith

Graduate Student

Rachel Seiler-Smith is a Ph.D. candidate in “long” Eighteenth-Century and Romantic British Literature, and holds a doctoral minor in Gender Studies. Her dissertation, Un/Accountable Enlightenment: Precarity, Population and the Ethics of Form, 1650-1830, theorizes “the account” as a robust literary form of the period that works (qualitatively and quantitatively) to engage with the problems of political care for the multitudes. Her work braids feminist ethics into a deeper intellectual, material and formal history of biopolitics, and pays particular attention to forms of exclusion, precarity and violence. An article from this project is forthcoming in European Romantic Review.

Wendy Lee Spacek

Wendy Lee Spacek

Graduate Student

Wendy Lee Spacek has published one book of poetry, PSYCHOGYNECOLOGY (Monster House Press, 2015). Her work has appeared in Blotterature, Monsterhousepress.com, Didactic and in LVNG Magazine by Flood Editions. She earned her BFA in Poetry from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2011. Prior to moving to Bloomington she spent 5 years in Indianapolis managing and facilitating art programs for youth, where she also curated the Soft River Reading Series from 2011-2016.

Whitney Sperrazza

Whitney Sperrazza

Graduate Student

Whitney Sperrazza is a Ph.D. candidate specializing in early modern poetry and drama, with secondary research interests in digital humanities and gender studies. Her dissertation, titled  "Perverse Intimacies: Reading the Early Modern Female Body," examines the triangulation between reading, intimacy, and violence in English poetry and drama (1560-1660). Framing these literary inquiries within the theories and practices of early anatomy, her project constructs a mode of formalist literary analysis rooted in the textured and somatic emphasis of early modern anatomical representations.

Heidi Støa

Heidi Støa

Graduate Student

Heidi Støa (Ph.D. candidate) is a medievalist focusing on Middle English and Old Norse/Icelandic literature and culture. She is writing a dissertation on liveliness and animation in a series of Middle English and Old Norse texts and has published on Old Norse translated romance. Her interests include the transmission of texts in the medieval North Atlantic (the British Isles, Scandinavia, Iceland), medieval and modern aesthetics, image theory, medieval theories of memory, translation, and the history of books and manuscripts. Before coming to IU, she worked as a curator in the Manuscripts Collection of the National Library of Norway.

Chris J. Thomas

Chris J. Thomas

Graduate Student

My teaching and research focuses on nineteenth-century literature, both American and Victorian. Within this area of study, I am particularly interested in travel narratives and theories of cross-cultural exchange. These interests inform my dissertation project, which centers on nineteenth-century travel accounts of Polynesia, theorizing how cultural makers (tattoos, hula, cannibal forks, etc.) were imagined as representing “authentic” Polynesian culture. My work on this topic, “Clothed in Tattoos: Cultural Fluidity in George Vason’s Authentic Narrative of Four Years’ Residence at Tongataboo,” can be found in the journal Studies in Travel Writing.

Mary Helen Truglia

Mary Helen Truglia

Graduate Student

Mary Helen Truglia is a graduate student and Associate Instructor in the English Literature program, focusing on Early Modern English Women's Writing with an interdepartmental minor in Renaissance Studies. Her other academic interests and specialties include English Renaissance poetry, the epic and romance tradition, Shakespeare, Milton, gender and women's studies, Austen studies, literary and filmic adaptation studies, YA literature, teaching composition, and teaching Early Modern literature.

Andrea Whitacre

Andrea Whitacre

Graduate Student

I study medieval literature with a focus in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse. My research examines medieval conceptions of subjectivity and the body through a posthumanist lens. My teaching interests include the culture and literature of the Middle Ages as well as medievalism in pop culture, science fiction, and fantasy.

Miranda Wojciechowski

Miranda Wojciechowski

Graduate Student

Miranda Wojciechowski is a second-year Ph.D. student in the program. She is interested in 19th and 20th century British literature, Victorian Studies, and Gender and Sexuality Studies, and her current research focuses on the figurations of reading and disease as entangled social phenomena during the Victorian period.

Shannon Zellars-Strohl

Graduate Student

Shannon Zellars-Strohl specializes in late-Victorian fiction and is completing her dissertation on the relationship between religion, science, and the supernatural during this period. She has presented her work at such conferences as NAVSA, ACLA, NCSA, and INCS. Shannon currently serves as a Lecturer at RISD in Rhode Island, teaching classes on Victorian fiction, Literature of the Supernatural, and Horror Films.

Amanda Zoch

Amanda Zoch

Graduate Student

Amanda Zoch is a Ph.D. candidate in literature. Her dissertation explores representations and performances of pregnancy in early modern drama and women’s writing. Other areas of interest include feminist and queer studies and food studies.

M.F.A. Graduate Students

Brianna Barnes Headshot

Brianna Barnes

Graduate Student

Brianna is an MFA candidate in Fiction at Indiana University. Brianna received bachelor's degrees in Literature (Creative Writing concentration) and Art from the University of California at Santa Cruz, and later studied Trauma Prevention and Recovery at City College of San Francisco. She is interested in representations of trauma, resilience, and survival in literature. Her writing has been published in 300 Days of Sun, Apeiron Review, Jenny Magazine, and Ohio Edit.

Elizabeth Boyle Headshot

Elizabeth Boyle

Graduate Student

Elizabeth is a first-year MFA candidate in fiction. From the Chicago area, she has bachelor's and master's degrees in English and Education, respectively, from the University of Illinois and a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. A former collegiate and professional cross country and track athlete, she has also worked as an assistant distance coach for Illinois and Michigan. In the summer, she often leads high school students on canoe trips through Quetico Provincial Park in Northwest Ontario. Writing interests include mental and physical health, theological imagination, and the environment.

Anna Cabe

Anna Cabe

Graduate Student

Anna Cabe was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and hasn't stopped moving since, though she claims the South, especially Memphis, Tennessee, as home. She received a BA in English literature-creative writing from Agnes Scott College in 2013. Recently returned from a two-year stint in Indonesia where she was a 2013-2014 Fulbright English Teaching Assistant, she is eager to set down roots in Bloomington, at least for a little while. Anna's work can be found in The Toast, Smokelong Quarterly, Necessary Fiction, Split Lip Magazine, and Cleaver, among others. She was a 2015 Kore Press Short Fiction Award semifinalist, a finalist for Midwestern Gothic's Summer 2016 Flash Fiction Series, and a finalist for the 2015 Boulevard Short Fiction Contest for Emerging Writers. She serves as the current web editor of the Indiana Review. Other interests include Asian American studies, Asian American literature, gender studies, popular culture studies, film studies, and folklore.

Su Cho

Su Cho

Graduate Student

Su Cho received her B.A. in English, Creative Writing, and Psychology from Emory University. She is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Indiana Review, an M.F.A. Candidate in Poetry and an M.A. Candidate in English Literature, and the third-year MFA Representative. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Crab Orchard Review, The Journal, BOAAT, Thrush Poetry Journal, Day One, and others.

Emily Corwin

Emily Corwin

Graduate Student

Emily Corwin is a Midwestern girl who loves pretty things. She is an MFA candidate in poetry at Indiana University-Bloomington. Her writing has appeared in smoking glue gun, glitterMOB, Rust + Moth, Word Riot, Midwestern Gothic, as well as others. Her chapbook, My Tall Handsome was published in Spring 2016 through Brain Mill Press, as part of the Mineral Point Chapbook Series. Her writing and research interests include gurlesque poetics, fairy tales, film studies, and conceptual poetry.

Soleil David Headshot

Soleil David

Graduate Student

Soleil David was born and raised in the Philippines. She received her B.A. with high distinction in English from the University of California at Berkeley. She is a 2017 PEN Center USA Emerging Voices Fellow and a Graduate Scholars Fellow. Her poetry and prose have been published in Our Own Voice, The Philippine Daily Inquirer, Pittsburgh Poetry Review, Santa Ana River Review and The Margins.

Noah Davis Headshot

Noah Davis

Graduate Student

Noah Davis graduated with a BA in English literature from Seton Hill University in 2017. He has published work with The Hollins Critic, Atlanta Review, Water~Stone Review, Appalachia, and Chiron Review among others. In 2015 Davis received Pushcart Prize nominations for poetry from both Poet Lore and Natural Bridge. His prose is published or forthcoming in Orion, Gray’s Sporting Journal, The Fly Fish Journal, Kestrel, and Angler’s Journal. 

Ryann Eastman

Ryann Eastman

Graduate Student

Ryann Eastman is a California native with a B.A. in English and Creative Writing from Oberlin College. She is a second year M.F.A. candidate and a reader for Electric Literature's Recommended Reading. Her work has appeared in matchbook and she was named a finalist for the 2015 Lascaux Prize in Flash Fiction.

Bix Gabriel

Bix Gabriel

Graduate Student

Bix Gabriel is a writer, MFA fiction candidate at Indiana University-Bloomington, fiction editor for The Offing magazine, occasional Tweeter, seeker of the perfect jalebi, and a wishful gardener. Her nonfiction has appeared in Hyphen magazine and Guernica and her fiction was most recently published in SmokeLong Quarterly. She is currently working on a novel, interlacing Bangladesh's 1971 war for independence and the war on terror, set in New York, Dhaka, and Guantánamo Bay.

Mariah Gese Headshot

Mariah Gese

Graduate Student

Mariah Gese is a writer and musician from Buffalo, New York. She received her B.A. in Creative Writing from Ohio Wesleyan University, then moved to Brooklyn to sell books, flowers, and coffee. She is now a first-year M.F.A. candidate in fiction at Indiana University, where she is at work on a novel about classic cars and murder.

Meredith Irvin Headshot

Meredith Irvin

Graduate Student

Meredith Irvin is a first-year M.F.A. candidate in Poetry at Indiana University with secondary research interests in sociolinguistics, gender & sexuality studies, and contemporary feminist theory. She received her B.A. in Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology from Washington University in St. Louis where she minored in Writing. As a graduate student in Psychology at The Ohio State University, she examined how acute stress influences childhood language development. Her current poetry orbits themes of intersectional identity, astronomy, and mythic reclaiming in relation to the internal self. In her free time, she enjoys charcoal drawing, playing piano and long distance running.

Soo Jin Lee

Soo Jin Lee

Graduate Student

Soo Jin Lee is a first-year M.F.A. candidate in fiction. A North Carolina native and graduate of Oberlin College, she previously worked in Seoul as an English test developer and an EFL teacher. Her current writing interests broadly circle around the Asian American experience, cross-cultural relationships, and, more recently, body horror.

Essence London

Essence London

Graduate Student

Essence London is working on a book-length poem that is surreal & Afrofuturistic; she also has a novel in the works. She makes books & letterpress prints & wants to start a small press in her hometown North Little Rock, Arkansas. A few poems of hers are floating around on the internet at Kinfolks Quarterly, Vinyl, joINT., and The Watering Hole. In addition to Indiana University's M.F.A. program, she's spent time at: Texas Tech's English graduate program, Oxford American, The Field Office, and Cave Canem. She also has a really energetic son named after a river.

Yael Massen

Yael Massen

Graduate Student

Yael Massen holds an undergraduate degree in Psychology and English from SUNY-Geneseo. Her work can be found within the pages and URLs of Mid-American Review, Tupelo Quarterly, The Ilanot Review, Columbia: A Journal of Literature and Art, Southern Indiana Review, Lilith, and Ninth Letter. A recipient of the 2016 Vera Meyer Strube Academy of American Poets Award and the 2016 Kraft-Kinsey Award from the Kinsey Institute, she has also received support from The Yiddish Book Center, The National Society of Arts and Letters (Bloomington), Middlebury Summer Language School, and The Borns Jewish Studies Program. Yael has served as an M.F.A. Representative as well as Nonfiction Editor and Associate Poetry Editor of Indiana Review. www.yaelmassen.com

Willy Palomo

Willy Palomo

Graduate Student

Willy Palomo learned poetry from the worlds of hip-hop and slam poetry. In 2015, he received his B.A. in English and Creative Writing and an Honors degree from Westminster College in Salt Lake City, where he founded the college's first poetry slam team and served as Editor-in-Chief to ellipsis... literature and art. He has competed in poetry slam nationally as a member of Salt City Slam and Westminster Slam. His work has been published or is forthcoming in muzzle, HeArt Online, Vinyl, and elsewhere. He is also pursuing an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean studies.

Simone Person

Simone Person

Graduate Student

Simone Person is a Graduate Scholars Fellow and dual Fiction M.F.A. and African American and African Diaspora Studies M.A.. She grew up in Michigan and Ohio, resulting in a delightfully nasal Midwestern accent. Her chapbook was a finalist selection for Black Lawrence Press’s Spring 2016 Black River Chapbook Competition. Her work has appeared in or is forthcoming from Moonsick Magazine, Beecher’s Magazine, Cosmonauts Avenue, Kweli Journal, and others, and she is WusGood Mag’s March 2017 Featured Artist. Simone is a textbook Libra whose main interests are the musical stylings of DMX and Trick Daddy, horror movies, bougie craft beers, and eating charcuterie plates with friends.

Gionni Ponce

Gionni Ponce

Graduate Student

Gionni Ponce is, first and foremost, a Latinx recreator--of fabric, furniture, charcoal, memories. As a first-year M.F.A. candidate, her primary form is fiction; but she also enjoys exploring other media including nonfiction, travel blogging, poetry, photography, and drawing. Her work is published in CRED Philly, Tony Ward Studio, The MFA Years, TakePart, and La Vida Magazine. Both Detroit and Phoenix are her homes. She aims to create self-expression that is necessary.

Maggie Su

Maggie Su

Graduate Student

Maggie Su's stories have appeared or are forthcoming in The Offing, The Journal, Green Mountains Review, New Flash Fiction Review, SmokeLong Quarterly, Word Riot, and elsewhere. She currently attends Indiana University's M.F.A. program and serves as fiction editor for Indiana Review. You can follow her @litmagreject.

Tessa Yang

Tessa Yang

Graduate Student

Tessa Yang is a second-year M.F.A. candidate in fiction writing at Indiana University, where she teaches creative writing and serves as the Associate Editor of Indiana Review. She was raised in Rochester, New York, and received her B.A. in English from St. Lawrence University in 2015. Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Clockhouse, Lunch Ticket, Fine Linen, and R.kv.r.y Quarterly.

Rhetoric Graduate Students

Caddie Alford

Caddie Alford

Graduate Student

I focus on rhetoric/composition, and my research interests include doxa, digital rhetorics, rhetorical invention, and writing pedagogies. I am invested in rhetorical theories and the process of theory-building, and to that end, my dissertation project attempts to create a contemporary theory of doxa, with implications for social media. My first article, “Creating with the “Universe of the Undiscussed”: Hashtags, Doxa, and Choric Invention” is forthcoming in Enculturation. I teach versions of introductory composition; professional writing; digital writing; and argumentative writing. My overall approach to teaching is to both appreciate and work with what my students bring to the table.

Collin Bjork

Collin Bjork

Graduate Student

Collin Bjork is a Ph.D. Candidate in Rhetoric and Composition. His dissertation develops the idea of "cumulative ethos" and reveals a) how character accretes over time and b) how non-kairotic conceptions of time complicate rhetorical theory. He has taught courses in visual rhetoric, service learning writing, online composition, multilingual composition, and cross-cultural composition. Collin also worked as an Online Instructional Designer and as a Program Assistant for Multilingual Composition. As a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant, he taught at the University of Montenegro in Podgorica. ​

Jennifer Wargel Juszkiewicz

Jennifer Juszkiewicz

Graduate Student

I specialize in composition theory and spatial rhetoric, and my dissertation focuses on simultaneously virtual and material public spaces for writing. At IU, I am in the Composition, Literacy, & Culture Program with a minor in pedagogy. I hold a Master’s degree in literature from the University of Notre Dame and have published and taught with scholars from other fields, including mathematics and religion. I am a co-Assistant Director of the W131 Composition program.

Rachel McCabe

Graduate Student

Rachel McCabe is working toward her Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Composition. Her research interests include the cognitive and affective connections between literature, rhetoric, and reader response, with a focus on 20th century American short fiction, the use of the grotesque as a pedagogical tool, and the link between reading and writing practices. Authors of interest include Flannery O'Connor, Sylvia Plath, J.D. Salinger, Kurt Vonnegut, William Faulkner, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Becky Ottman

Becky Ottman

Graduate Student

My scholarly interests include multilingual pedagogy and placement practices, first-year composition theory, and classical rhetoric. I am intrigued by how multilingual students are categorized according to traditional placement practices and how such categorization affects the development of their writing processes. My research considers rhetorical approaches to current placement strategies for multilingual students entering college composition in efforts to evolve and improve these areas. My areas of interest in teaching include first-year composition and multilingual composition.

Laura Rosche

Laura Rosche

Graduate Student

Scholarly Interests: New media and digital rhetoric; composition pedagogies; issues of writing transfer; disability theory and rhetorics; autobiographical literacies Teaching interests: Contemplative pedagogies; first-year composition; disability studies and pop culture.